Tag Archive | romantic mystery

The Trojan Legacy – Free on Amazon for 5 Days

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My latest romantic mystery novel The Trojan Legacy is currently free on Amazon for 5 days. That’s from today, Monday 18th July until midnight on Friday 22nd July, Pacific Daylight Time (PDT). After that it will return to its normal price.

This eBook has only been on sale for a month, so this is the perfect opportunity to download it if you haven’t already read it. If you don’t have a Kindle, you can download a free kindle app to your device from any Amazon site, and read it on that.

I’m not giving spoilers by telling my romance readers that they will get the happy ending they expect, but not before my characters have had to work hard against some obstacles in their way. Like my other romantic mysteries, this book has something to interest readers of mysteries and lovers of history as well. It dabbles with bits of the Trojan War (one of my all-time favourite topics) as well as some nostalgic South African history, including a fictional chance meeting with one of my real-life heroes. (Hint – part of it is set in South Africa in 1962 and… okay that’s enough. No more spoilers!)

It’s a dual timeline story and takes place in modern-day Melbourne as well as 1962 South Africa. I hope you find it entertaining.

The quickest way to download the book is to click on the image in the sidebar to the right, and it will take you to the book’s product page in your nearest Amazon store. If you prefer, you can click here instead, or here for the book’s product page at Amazon.com.

As I usually say at times like this: if you enjoy the book, please tell everyone you know. In fact, if you really enjoy it, please consider leaving a review on Amazon or Goodreads so that more people will be able to see what you’ve said and that will hopefully swell future sales.

But if you don’t enjoy reading it please send me a message on the contact form either here or on my website, telling me what you didn’t enjoy about the book. All constructive criticism will be taken on board and will help towards improving future novels.

I do hope you enjoy the read…

The Trojan Legacy – Now Live on Amazon!

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My latest novel has launched at last! The Trojan Legacy is now on Amazon as an eBook, and you can find it here.

This is a full-length novel, in the same genre of Romantic Mystery in which my first two full-length novels were written. The action takes place in two different countries, in two different time frames.

Regina, a new immigrant to Australia, seeks out the family whose name she has found in her grandmother’s papers. Together with piano-playing barman Bobby, she unravels the history of an ancient diadem which was unearthed from the ruins of Troy, but which later disappeared at the end of the Second World War. A novel of mystery and romance, set in both modern-day Melbourne and 1960s South Africa, the story unfolds against a unique slice of South African history.

Thank you to all those of you who helped me to choose between the two covers for this novel. It was (to misquote the words of Wellington after the Battle of Waterloo) a close-run thing. There were so many points in favour of both covers that I felt quite bad being able to choose only one. The cover I chose was (A) – the brighter, deeper blue background with the bigger lettering. With its vibrant colour, it has a resemblance to the cover of The Epidaurus Inheritance, and even though they are not part of a series, they are the same genre. The main deciding factor was because it really does stand out better in a thumbnail, which is what most Kindle readers will be looking at when (hopefully) choosing it as their next book to read.

Visibility is the key in every sense, it seems. I have no doubt that the readers who enjoyed my previous books will enjoy this one as much – if not more so – but they just have to find it first. Unfortunately, since the last time I put a book up on Amazon, in October 2012, there are literally hundreds of thousands more books available than there used to be, and we’re all pushing and shoving for elbow room in the same arena.

So if you happen to be one of those readers who enjoyed either The Epidaurus Inheritance or Benicio’s Bequest, why not pop over to Amazon.com, click on the cover to read the first two chapters, and see how you like it. You can even click on the book cover in the sidebar to your right and it’ll take you to my book’s product page in the Amazon store nearest you.

Go on – you know you want to…!

Which Book Cover Would You Choose?

I’m very excited about the upcoming release of my new romantic mystery novel, and would like readers to help me choose which cover they prefer.

Here’s the blurb:

An ancient diadem unearthed from the ruins of Troy disappears from a Berlin museum at the end of the Second World War. In 1962, archaeologists Ellen and Marcus track the diadem into the mountains of the Drakensberg, believing it was hidden there by a Nazi who stole it and escaped before the Nuremberg trials. South Africa’s apartheid government wants the diadem, but so does the underground political party known as the ANC.

Ellen and Marcus have their own reasons for wanting the diadem, but Inspector Uys has a darker purpose and will stop at nothing to prevent Nelson Mandela and the ANC from taking control of the country.

Two generations later an Australian bartender and a South African travel agent put together the disjointed clues from their respective grandparents, and set off on a trail of their own in search of answers.

These are the two covers: Let’s call them A and B.

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Which do you think is more eye-catching? Bear in mind this is for an ebook to be sold on Amazon, and the image can be quite small when viewed on some reading devices. It’s not part of a series, but it is the same genre as the first and third books in the sidebar on the right.

Please let me know your thoughts in the comments below. Thank you for your time – your input will be greatly appreciated!

The Epidaurus Inheritance – now Free on Amazon for 5 Days

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My romantic mystery novel The Epidaurus Inheritance is currently free on Amazon for 5 days. That’s from today, Monday 25th April until midnight on Friday 29th April, Pacific Daylight Time (PDT). After that it will return to its original price of $2.99.

If you haven’t already read this book, now is a good time to download it because it’ll cost you absolutely nothing except the time to read it. Don’t despair if you don’t have a kindle, because you can download a free kindle app to your device from any Amazon site, and read it on that. What could be simpler?

As I said last month when one of my other books – Benicio’s Bequest – was up for free, I know that romantic mysteries are not everyone’s cup of tea, but I like writing them because I’ve always enjoyed reading them. I don’t regard mine as regular romances, because there’s always a mystery to solve along the way, usually with a good dollop of history, art and possibly a smattering of the classics thrown in, and this novel is no exception.

The Epidaurus Inheritance is set in Greece, one of my favourite places in the world; a place which, for me, has always been steeped in history, drama and mythology, to say nothing of being the birthplace of theatre as we know it. In fact, that’s where this novel starts – at a modern performance of an ancient Greek play.

Cassie is the set designer for a South African production of a play which is being staged at one of the oldest Greek theatres in the world – the enormous open-air stone structure that is Epidaurus – as part of the annual summer festival. For the design of a ceremonial knife used in the play, Cassie has copied the design of an ancient knife she inherited from her Greek father, which was handed down through the generations before him. Cassie has always been fascinated by the knife and is hoping to find out more about it now that she is in Greece.

Unfortunately for Cassie, she is not the only one interested in it. In addition to Zander, the antiquities investigator who starts badgering her about the original knife, a group of silent men who are part of an obscure religious order always seem to turn up in the same place as Cassie at the wrong time. Before long there is a break-in at Cassie’s hotel and she no longer knows who to trust.

Cassie’s quest takes her to Athens, Galaxidi, Delphi and the island of Poros, and along the way she is dogged by knife-wielding lunatics, murder, betrayal, kidnapping and fire. On the lighter side, she finds love, ancient artworks and an archaeological secret that she thought existed only in her dreams.

To those of you who downloaded last month’s book – Benicio’s Bequest – I hope you enjoyed it enough to want to try this one as well. Thank you to those of you who left reviews on Amazon and Goodreads. Your kind words are much appreciated.

As I always say – if you enjoy the read please tell everyone you know, but if you don’t enjoy it please send me a message on the contact form either here or on my website, telling me what you didn’t like. All constructive criticism will go towards improving future novels. And if you really enjoyed it, please consider leaving a review on Amazon or Goodreads. Or both.

You can download The Epidaurus Inheritance here from Amazon.com, or here from the Amazon store nearest to you, any time between now and Friday night in the USA. If you are elsewhere in the world, you’ll still have until later on Saturday to download it: 7 am in the UK, 8 am in South Africa and 4 pm in the eastern part of Australia. If you are anywhere else, you can check your time zone against Pacific Daylight Time with world time buddy.

Here’s hoping you have fun on your whirlwind reading trip through Greece…!

Free Novel for 5 Days on Amazon

My romantic mystery novel Benicio’s Bequest is currently free on Amazon for five days. So if you haven’t read it before, now’s your chance. And if you don’t have a Kindle on which to read it, you can download the free Kindle app on the same page at Amazon.

I do understand that if you’re not into romantic mysteries you’ll probably want to give it a miss. However, it is free so it won’t cost you anything other than time, so why not find out whether you might enjoy a romance with a bit of historical mystery thrown in? It’s free until midnight on Friday 18th March. Midnight on Pacific time, that is, so readers in the UK, South Africa, Australia and various other parts of the world have until sometime on Saturday to download it before it goes back to its original price of $2.99.

I don’t write to a specific formula and my style is not that of most books which fall into the popular genre of romance. Obviously I like to give romance readers the ending they expect (hint – I love happy endings), but I also like to give readers of mysteries and lovers of history a little bit of what they enjoy too. Those of us who write mixed genres will tell you that our books are formally categorised into the genre which ticks the most boxes, but there is always room in those pages for a little extra entertainment.

I don’t write erotica, so you won’t find Fifty Shades of Anything Like That between the covers of my books, but if you enjoy good old fashioned romance in the style made famous by Mary Stewart, then you’ll enjoy my feisty heroines and the puzzled chaps they take up with while trying to solve a mystery that involves something historical, in an exotic place.

My heroines always find themselves in what’s known as a fish-out-of-water situation, usually while on holiday overseas or in a new place they have moved to but haven’t yet settled down in. In that place there is a man who might be willing to help, or who needs help himself, and their paths cross.

There is always something historical involved – an artefact, a painting, a box of letters – and the two characters are thrown together and forced to tolerate each other while they navigate unfamiliar waters on their mutual quest.

Inevitably, this leads to conflict, doubt, betrayal, and just a little bit of chemical sparkery along the way. They fall into an adventure with enough danger for them to realise they don’t want to die, or to live without each other, but they have to solve the mystery and vanquish the Bad Guy before they can find their happy ending. There is a climactic confrontation with said Bad Guy, after which our hero and heroine emerge changed, older and much more in love than when they first started.

Benicio’s Bequest is set in Italy and follows the adventures of holidaying art teacher Lisa, who witnesses the murder of a man who has been trying to chat her up in the courtyard of Juliet’s house in Verona. Minutes before he is gunned down, he slips a notebook addressed to his brother into her handbag. Lisa delivers the notebook to the brother, Matteo, a wood artist who lives in Venice. Thus begins an adventure in which Lisa and Matteo have to uncover the art forgery scam that killed Matteo’s painter brother, Benicio.

As I always say – if you enjoy it, please write a review on Amazon or Goodreads (or both!) and if you don’t enjoy it, rather send me a private email via my Contact Me page, telling me why you didn’t like it. I am always open to constructive criticism, and will take valid points on board, in order to improve the next novel.

You can download Benicio’s Bequest here from Amazon.com, or here from the Amazon store nearest to you. Happy reading…!

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Wonder-Filled Inspiration

As a teenager I dreamed of overseas travel, yearning to see not only the scenery, but the artworks and architecture of the world.

I was fourteen when television started in our country, and one of my most vivid memories is of watching Lord Kenneth Clark’s Civilisation. The series was almost ten years old by then, but it didn’t matter. Each episode fascinated me, and there was plenty of time to mull it over before the next because they were broadcast every alternate Sunday evening. During the weeks between, I searched the school library, looking up the artists and the buildings, hoping to see colour pictures, because our television was – of course – black-and-white!

Yes, if you’re wondering how I was able to appreciate such things on an ancient monochrome television (of if you’re baffled by why I took the trouble to page through actual dusty books to see tiny reproductions), let me assure you, it wasn’t a chore!

Six months after I graduated from university with my arts degree, I went to Europe with my boyfriend – a man I met soon after graduation, and with whom I shared a passion for theatre, art, literature, old churches, galleries, castles and in fact, anything of historical interest. We did the whole Grand Tour, just like the Victorians but in different clothing (and in slightly more modern transport). We also fought a lot, but the good memories outweigh the bad…

Anyway, back to the art. We walked around Michelangelo’s magnificent David, saw his Pieta from a distance across the crowd, and were able to get up close and personal with his Moses on that first trip. Together we stood beneath Juliet’s balcony in Verona, took a gondola ride through Venice and watched the glass blowers on the island of Murano. We picked our way across the stones of the Acropolis, gawped up at the Parthenon and saw a modern day performance in the ancient theatre of Epidaurus. Later, in the Louvre, we craned our necks to see the Mona Lisa and walked unimpeded around the Venus de Milo. We crammed a lot into six weeks!

A few years ago when I found Lord Kenneth Clark’s Civilisation series on DVD, I bought it immediately. Didn’t even check the price. I took it home and wallowed in the luxury of the entire thing once again – bit by bit, usually on a Sunday night, and with my own collection of art books and overseas photographs to hand. It’s a toss-up as to whether the most striking thing was the ability to rewind, pause, zoom and relive the best bits, or the fact that I could now see it all in glorious colour, and on a bigger, clearer screen!

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Much of the series I had forgotten in the intervening thirty years so I was able to feast on its delights anew, but I also realised just how much had remained in my subconscious during that first trip to Europe, guiding me through the Uffizi gallery and the Louvre, up the leaning tower of Pisa, and past Michelangelo’s timeless works.

Six years after that first trip, I took a second one and I’m not ashamed to say that I revisited many of the same places with my three travelling companions – even managed to drag two of them up Pisa’s leaning tower, back in the days when one could still go up it and stand in front of the huge bells on the top. Something about those incredible, old places fired me up and inspired in me all sorts of romantic and creative dreams. It was as if I couldn’t get enough of the roots of western civilisation. In retrospect it was just as well that I stored all the memories up inside me because I’ve never since been able to afford to go back.

After twenty years of not venturing beyond the borders of my own continent, my family’s circumstances changed a few years back. I’ve now been to Australia three times. On my first visit I feasted on Shakespeare under the Stars, drank in Melbourne’s unique architecture, mosaics, domes, arcades and bridges, and shed tears at the Shrine of Remembrance. In Federation Square I visited Melbourne’s monument to film: the Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI), and later sampled the culinary arts of Lygon Street.

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I gazed at bronze and marble sculptures all over the city, contemporary graffiti in the lanes and sand sculptures in Frankston.

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On my second visit to Melbourne two years later I listened to local pianists tinkering on the keys of brightly decorated pianos left out in the open for an initiative called “Play me, I’m Yours.” IMG_0999

I drifted around the Tyabb Packing House with its acres of antiques, wore down my shoe soles in the Melbourne Museum and both venues of the National Gallery of Victoria. In the larger of these, I found myself gazing in wonder at Impressionist paintings, as well as sculptures by Rodin and Henry Moore. Two visits to this gallery weren’t enough to see everything so two days after arriving back in Melbourne on my third trip, I legged it down St Kilda Road in the pelting rain for another drool!

So what does this have to do with writing? Nothing on the surface, but it has everything to do with inspiration. I am well aware that not everyone shares my passion for European history or western civilisation (or whatever other name you choose to call it, particularly in my home country where anything western is now regarded as the work of colonial devils) but it has always been – and will always be – a part of my long-ago heritage, my current mental make-up, and my inspiration for the novels I write.

History evolves as fast as it’s created, but some things linger longer in our subconscious than others. Certain stories resonate or touch us more than others. My great triggers are the Trojan War, related tales by Homer and the Greek playwrights, ancient Rome, the bittersweet romance of Romeo and Juliet, Renaissance art, the First World War and absolutely anything to do with theatre.

The list is long and should provide me with plenty of ammunition to conjure up stories to write for the rest of my writing career, but for anyone out there whose triggers are gratuitous violence and destruction, chemistry or science, corporate banking or politics, the wonders of accounting, mathematical skills, motherhood, babies or courtroom drama – well, I think you’ve probably guessed by now how I feel about those. Everyone has their own favourite corridors in the library of life, so you won’t find too many of those subjects in my book bag.

If everyone loved the same things I do, I’d be a better-selling author by now because more readers would be as enthralled with my subject matter as I am. I’m old enough to know and accept that this will never be the case, and I don’t write the type of high adventure favoured by Dan Brown, John Grisham and James Patterson so my mysteries are more whimsical, more romantic and consequently a lot less popular.

For those loyal readers who worry that I might change my style and jump on bandwagons that include fifty shades of erotica, sci-fi or fantasy, police procedurals or vampires, fear not! I will always be here with my own peculiar brand of history-soaked, romantic mysteries.

Following hot on the heels of my three previous works (the stories of a South African set designer and a Greek inspector of antiquities; a World War I letter writer and the two soldiers in her life; an art teacher and an Italian sculptor) comes the story of a romance in Melbourne between a travel agent and a Lygon Street pianist.

Watch this space…